Monday, October 12, 2020

October’s a Busy Time in the Garden

 Finish harvesting your vegetables. 


And if you have extra produce af
ter you’ve put up tons of food, consider donating to the Corvallis Backyard CSA with a mission to include all people in Corvallis. It does this by delivering produce boxes to families from different cultures (Asian, Middle Eastern, and Latin American) while building mutually supportive relationships with the families. 

Put your Garden to Bed for the Winter

Just because youre not growing vegetables in an area, it doesn’t mean you do nothing to improve the soil.

Rake on the Riches The cheapest way to improve your soil is to rake the leaves falling from nearby trees over your garden bed several inches thick. This keeps rain from washing away nitrogen from your soil. It also serves as food for the worms you want to thrive in your soil.

Plant a Cover Crop that adds nutrients to the soil, especially nitrogen. That’s why many gardeners plant beans and peas to winter over. Or your soil may benefit from seeds that reach deep into our clay soil. Check out the various cover crop seed offerings at our locally owned and operated nurseries.

Last month we mentioned adding lime now where you plan to put your tomatoes next summer.

Plant Crops to Grow Food in the Winter

With the use of hoop houses that are easy to make, you can extend the growing season. Even though this
hoop house is shown with its ends closed, most of the time during our mild winters, you can leave the ends to let the air circulate around the delicate greens you can grow inside, like hardier lettuces, spinach, arugula, etc.

Also now’s the time to plant garlic that will winter over and be ready to harvest around the Fourth of July next year. In fact, lots of root crops, like onions, leeks, turnips, and beets, grow well uncovered in the winter. Hardy greens like broccoli, kale, swiss chards, and brussels sprouts also don’t need to be covered to thrive in our winters.

So, try out winter gardening, realizing that from November 4 through February 5 we have only 10 hours of daylight or less which means that plant growth will be on the slow side.

Contact Sandi Cheung to find out how you can drop off produce that will be added to the CSA boxes. The boxes are delivered to families every Thursday.  sandi.cheung@gmail.com


Interested in learning other ways to support the Corvallis Backyard CSA? Check with rachel@shonnards.com or text/call 503-779-8570.

Food Action Team -- Edible Garden Group

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

What to do in the Garden in October

 

Maintenance and Clean Up

Dig and store potatoes; keep in darkness, moderate humidity, temperature about 40°F. Discard unused potatoes if they sprout. Don't use as seed potatoes for next year.

Ripen green tomatoes indoors. Check often and discard rotting fruit.

Harvest and store apples; keep at about 40°F, moderate humidity.

Place mulch over roots of roses, azaleas, rhododendrons and berries for winter protection.

Cover asparagus and rhubarb beds with a mulch of manure or compost.

Prune out dead fruiting canes in raspberries.

Harvest squash and pumpkins; keep in dry area at 55 degrees to 60 degrees Fahrenheit.Harvest squash and pumpkins; keep in dry area at 55 degrees to 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Planting and Propagation

Dig and divide rhubarb. (Should be done about every 4 years.)

Plant garlic for harvesting next summer.

Plant ground covers and shrubs.
Dig and store geraniums, tuberous

begonias, dahlias, and gladiolas.

Pot and store tulips and daffodils to force into early bloom, indoors, in December and January.

From Benton County Master Gardeners -
Membership meetings: 3rd Monday Oct. to May 7:00pm - currently on Zoom

Sunday, September 27, 2020

The Evening Garden Club Lives On...

 


The Corvallis Evening Garden Club Lives on...

...via Zoom*

Program Schedule 2020-21--First Monday of the Month – 7 p.m. as always


October 5 Jennifer Klammer, Past President EGC, Gardens of Japan

November 2   Double Bill!
    Kathleen Rochester A Gazillion Petals: One very flowery week in the

    Netherlands and Belgium

    Dan Edge, Co-President EGC Front Yard—Xeriscape Conversion 

December 7 Virtual Greens Party

    Members will offer greens from their gardens for pick-up during the week         before, and will share their creations during the meeting

January 4  Vanessa Gardner Nagel, Designer, Seasons Garden Design,                 LLC, Evaluating and Implementing New Garden Strategies

February 1 TBA

March 1 Loree Bohl, Author and Danger Garden Blogger 

    Fearless Gardening (her new book)

April 5  Lucy Hardiman, Designer, Lucy Hardiman Perennial Partners,

    History of Gardening in the Pacific Northwest

May 3  Member Plant and Garden Tips Exchange


*For information on Zoom link please contact Dan Edge Daniel.edge@oregonstate.edu

for membership and other information: www.corvalliseveninggardenclub.org

Monday, September 21, 2020

Bulb-A-Palooza

 



What:  Annual Fall Bulb Sale

Top Quality Bulbs from Holland packaged in a variety of choices: alliums, daffodils, species tulips, camas, saffron crocus and so much more!


Why: Support community gardening grants & horticulture scholarships

How: Order by email with no-contact pick up

Watch your listservs for full ordering information between September 10-14 -or- Request information from kathleen.rochester@gmail.com after Sept. 15

When:  Place orders Sept. 27— Oct. 6

Pick up and pay October 11-13, details when you order . First come, first served!

Sunday, September 13, 2020

EGC Plant Sale

 



is holding a

Plant Sale 

September 25th & 26th

Sign up to attend by time slot and get ready to load up!

https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0D4EACA628A7FBC07-plant

We’re creating safe shopping for you with masks, small numbers, distancing, and good sanitation.

Many, many perennials, shrubs, trees, and vines available!

Tip: Fall planting is much better for the plants. Look forward to a happier, more beautiful spring garden.

Monday, September 7, 2020

Soil Testing and Crop Rotation

 



Fall is a great time to get your soil tested and think about rotating crops in your garden. Before you put in your garlic (mid-October for us), get soil samples from the different beds in your garden. Check out https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/catalo g/files/project/pdf/ec628.pdf to find out how.

These links will help you find out where to send your samples https://catalog.extension.oregonstate. edu/sites/catalog/files/project/pdf/em8677_0.pdf & https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/ec1478 so you can find out just the right amendments to add to your soil for next year’s crops.

Leaves like lettuce, herbs, kale, arugula, spinach, and broccoli, are first in the rotation because they need to get first crack at the nitrogen (N) in the soil. This is very important for our soil, which tends to lack nitrogen, unless you put in lots of nitrogen along with compost and/or animal manure in the spring, not the fall.

Fruits include tomatoes, melons, squash, peppers, and eggplant. These plants need phosphorus (P) to produce fruit and nitrogen is less important to them. However, fruits like tomatoes need extra calcium in the soil and, since it takes a while to break down from added lime, it is a good idea to add your lime in the fall where you plan to put your tomatoes next year.

Root crops, like carrots, beets, onions, and garlic, need even less nitrogen than fruits; instead, they need lots of potassium (K) to develop their roots. Our soil has lots of potassium because of the rocks that were broken down to form it, so your root vegetables should thrive if you make sure the soil is broken up enough for their roots to go down deep into the soil.

Legumes are mostly green beans and peas. These plants as well as many cover crops can help replenish the nitrogen (N) in the soil, and at the same time, need lots of nitrogen themselves. That’s why they have nitrogen-fixing nodules on their roots. So don’t skimp on nitrogen come spring in the beds where your peas and beans are going to grow.


Corvallis Backyard CSA

Have extra produce from your garden after you’ve thinned your plants? Consider do-nating to the Corvallis Backyard CSA whose mission is inclusion for all people in Corvallis. It does this by delivering produce boxes to families from different cultures

(Asian, Middle Eastern, and Latin American) while building mutually supportive relationships with the families. Contact Sandi Cheung sandi.cheung@gmail.co

m to find out how you can drop off produce that will be added to the CSA boxes. The boxes are delivered to families every Thursday.

Interested in learning other ways to support the Corvallis Backyard CSA? Check with rachel@shonnards.com or text/call 503-779-8570.


Food Action Team -- Edible Garden Group meets on Wednesday September 9 from 5-6:30.  For more information contact Rachel Barnhart at rdbarn4@gmail.com.